Who Was Frederick Brady?

 

Research into the life of Frederick Brady was hindered for some time before it was found he had given an alias on his marriage certificate and in fact was convict John Brady. [1]

Henry Brady, youngest child of convict John Brady maintained that his father, known as Frederick Brady, came from County Cork, Ireland. It is believed from research done before 2009 by Norman Miller (grandson of Harry) that Frederick Brady was born in Inniscarra, County Cork, Ireland in 1835.[2] He was baptised on 21 July 1835. His mother Elizabeth knew his father as “Brady”. [3]

A visit to Inniscarra as part of a family history trip in 2015 unfortunately didn’t turn up any new information, but it gave great enjoyment to stand in the ruins of the local church that may have been the location of John’s baptism 180 years earlier.

No information about John Brady prior to his crime in 1854, Liverpool, England has been confirmed.

Inniscarra Cemetery

2nd Great Grandson Darryl Brady at Inniscarra Cemetery Feb 2015. Private collection [4]

John Brady (1835 – 1886)

Between 1845 – 1852 Ireland was struck by a widespread potato famine, which saw the population of the country decline by nearly 3 million people. During that time it was common to see ditches filled with the bodies of famine victims who had been evicted from their homes by landlords who continued to demand exorbitant rents, despite the fact that their tenants could no longer afford to pay them. [5]

Whilst somewhat unclear, it is believed that the famine was the reason behind John and possibly his family’s relocation to England, where he would later be convicted of robbery with violence in 1854.

At age 19, John – a man standing 5 feet one inches tall, with a sallow complexion, grey eyes, light brown hair, oval face and stout stature – was recognised in Warwick Street by several young girls from the neighbourhood of Toxteth, Liverpool following a violent robbery, and was subsequently convicted. Newspaper Reports of the trial do not give any information on John’s exact role in the crime, nor do they say if he lived in the immediate area, but the fact that he was recognised by locals may point to him living in the area, at least for some time.

 

The Liverpool Mercury, Tuesday,14 March 1854, listed the following account of the robbery,

 

SAVAGE GAROTTE ROBBERY

Three disreputable females, named Elizabeth Rafferty, Mary Stanley, and Jane M’Kay, together with two young men of a sailor-like appearance, named Thomas Brown and John Brady, were brought up on a charge of violently assaulting and robbing Mr Thomas Bibby of Warwick Street, of a £10 note, £8 10s in gold, 6s, a stamped receipt for £10 and a knife.

It appeared from the evidence that the prosecutor, who could hardly speak from the effects of the injuries he had received was proceeding to his residence in Warwick Street, between nine and ten o’clock on Tuesday night last (being at the time somewhat under the influence of drink), when he was first assailed by two females, who jostled him. He pushed them away, upon which he was instantly surrounded by four men and the females, who threw something around his neck and attempted to strangle him, by which he was rendered insensible. Whilst the male prisoners were holding him, the female prisoners turned out the prosecutor’s pockets and robbed him of his money, amounting in all to £18 10s, and the stamped receipt for ten pounds. The ruffians then decamped.

Three girls, named Mary Bennett, Elizabeth Williams, and Maria Fowler, deposed to seeing the male and two of the female prisoners follow and take hold of the prosecutor. The outrage having been communicated to the police, Inspector Horne, from information received from Mr Woods, publican, who resides in the neighbourhood of Warwick Street, and who stated that the keeper of a disorderly house had wished him to change a £10 note, went into the house in question, and asked the keeper, a Mrs Connor, what account she had to give of the note. In reply she gave a description of the prisoners, and Inspector Horne and a detective officer succeeded, after some difficulty, in apprehending the five prisoners in the same house, Mrs Connor deposed that the prisoners came into her house at an early hour on Wednesday morning and sent her out for two quarts of ale, and on one of the occasions of going out one of the prisoners gave her a £10 note to get changed.

This note she took Mr Woods, who refused to cash it; upon which the woman returned it, and Brown took it into his possession. Another female, who had been in the preceding witness’s house, stated that the prisoners asked her the value of the stamped receipt, and on being told it was worthless, being the receipt for the payment of £10 for a cart, the document was burnt. Mr Woods said that the female, Connor, upon his refusing to change the £10 note, offered to give him 10s as an inducement to do so, but he would not have anything to do with it, as he suspected a robbery had taken place.

As there was no evidence to implicate the prisoner M’Kay in the robbery, further than she was found in the house with the others by the officers she was discharged. Brown, Brady, Rafferty, and Stanley were remanded, the magistrate intimating that it was his intention to send them to trial at the assizes. The officers were directed to take active steps to apprehend, if possible, the other two female assailants. [6]

Further accounts were also Published on the 22 March in the Manchester Times [7], 24 March in the Hull Packet and East Riding Times [8], 25 March in the Manchester Times [9] and 30 March in the Nottinghamshire Guardian. [10]

 

After being found guilty, John and his accomplices received sentences of 20 years transportation.

Cohorts No 3 - 7, Liverpool Assizes,1854, Lancashire, England [6]

Cohorts No 3 – 7, Liverpool Assizes,1854, Lancashire, England [11]

After his conviction for Savage Garrotte Robbery, John spent time awaiting his transportation to Western Australia. The Character Book for John Brady lists him as being from the prison Defence. This would indicate that John spent time on the prison hulk HMS Defence which was converted to serve as a prison ship in 1849. Another notation lists Sulphur and possibly one other hulk that he may have been imprisoned in during his two year wait. [12]

 

Character Book for John Brady [3]

Character Book for John Brady [13]

The journey of the ship William Hammond that conveyed John to his new home left Plymouth, England on 5 January 1856 and arrived on 29 March 1856 at Fremantle, Western Australia. The ship list records him as convict 3944. [14]

John received his Ticket of Leave on 20 April 1859, just a little over five years after his conviction. This would have allowed him to expand his prospects in this new land but it would be another three years before he would receive his Conditional Pardon on the 12 December 1862.

Unfortunately for John, this would not be his last brush with the law. On 7 December 1870 he was reconvicted at Perth, for stealing from a dwelling house in the town of York. It seems from this conviction that John again fell victim to a crime of opportunity. A local man William Godfrey had taken to storing money and valuables in a box in his bedroom. Knowing this, John forced open a window and made off with the contents of the box. According to the Perth Gazette, he was sentenced to 8 years for this offence. [15]

 

Convict Department Register ACC 1156/R16 for John Brady. [6]

Convict Department Register ACC 1156/R16 for John Brady. [16]

From this point forward in the records John was listed as convict 10021. His conduct paints a poor picture of his continued criminal life. From having a pair of boots in his possession, supposedly stolen, absent from camp and idle on the works, to being in the bar of the Freemason’s Hotel without permission and stealing seven pickaxes and one sack – Government property.  John’s punishment for his actions, range from days on bread and water only to receive sometimes days or even month’s extended on his time.

 

Signature of John Brady as recorded on 1875 ticket of leave clothing form. [7]

Signature of John Brady as recorded on 1875 ticket of leave clothing form. [17]

Another area of John’s life that was not going so well for him was his health. Records show that he suffered from a number of medical issues that could be seen as common to anyone living a convict life.

 

Convict Department Register ACC 1156/R16 for John Brady.

Convict Department Register ACC 1156/R16 for John Brady.

 

Some of the most interesting information still to be explored is the number of times John presented ill during his convict years. Some of his times are recorded for common issues like constipation or a cough for which he sought relief. [18]

One ongoing issue between 1856 and 1858 was for facial ringworm, a fungal infection of the skin that could present as inflammation of the scalp, associated with reddening of the skin, itching, circles of peeling skin and hair loss. On a number of occasions he spent consecutive days being treated with ointment applied to his face. [19] [20]

From 1857 onward John also suffered from a condition called Ophthalmia – inflammation of one or both eyes. His occupation during this time is listed as quarry worker and plasterer’s labourer. One entry notes that the Ophthalmia is due to the lime in the plastering process. This recorded as an issue for John many times over the next 15 years. [21] The issue is commonly associated with poor nutrition. [22]

 

Sometime after John’s second conviction in York he began to use the name Frederick or Frederick Joseph Brady. Talking with living descendants of his children revealed that this is the only name he was known by until research began. His marriage to Mary Frances Dee, illness at time of his death and his burial are all recorded as Frederick Brady. [23]

Was this an attempt to start-a-fresh? Meeting a wife of half his age and starting a family under an assumed name? One hundred and thirty years after his death he would be able to claim over 550 direct descendants, with more than a few having his roguish nature. [24]

One interesting coincidental fact is that his 4th wedding anniversary and the granting of his full pardon both took place on the 29 September 1880.

In 1886 John became ill and was sent to Perth Hospital, where he subsequently died from a brain tumor. Following his death Mary Frances and the children were left destitute, and were accommodated at the Women’s Home and Orphanage. [25] John Brady was buried on the 20 December 1886 in the East Perth Cemetery, Western Australia along with his daughter Elizabeth May ‘Mary’ Brady, both in unmarked graves. [26]

Mary Francis Dee (1857 – 1921)

Mary Frances Brady (nee Dee) re-married William Cardwell in 1888 in Dongara and had another five children. [27] It is understood that she did not have an ongoing relationship with most of her Brady children and as a result each of the boys had limited contact with her and the families grew apart over time. The descendants of each line were never fully linked and recognised as one family until recently, when current generations began to compile a full family tree. [28]

 

Frederick Francis Brady (1879 1967)

Eldest child, Frederick Francis Brady, was born on 18 April 1879. He married Harriett Cousins, daughter of George Cousins and Frances Anna (nee Pell). [29] Currently Frederick’s descendants (including spouses) numbers 273 individuals, with some of the names being: Bass, Ellis, Clark, Walton, Armstrong, Oldfield, Nairn, Rinaldi and Shaddick. These descendants have been known to work in occupations including Station Hand, Police Officer, Bakery Storekeeper, Smash Repairer, Transport, Mail Officer, Engineering Clerk, Public Transport Authority, Miner and School Teacher. [30]

Elizabeth May Brady (1881 – 1887)

John and Mary’s second child (and only daughter) Elizabeth May ‘Mary’ Brady was born in 1881, but sadly passed away on 29 July 1887, one year after John’s own death. [31]

The following excerpts were discovered in The Daily News:

NEWS OF THE DAY (2 June 1887) The Daily News

“A little girl, named May Brady, an inmate of the Perth Protestant Orphanage, received very serious injuries yesterday through her clothes catching fire. She had a cotton dress on at the time, but the flames had so rapidly penetrated her underclothing that before they were extinguished the poor creature’s right side was terribly burned. Dr Waylen was quickly summoned and everything was done to relieve the sufferer.” [32]

NEWS OF THE DAY (29 July 1887) The Daily News

“About three weeks ago a little girl, of about six years of age, named Mary Brady was accidentally severely burned at the Perth Protestant Orphanage. At first hopes were entertained of her recovery, but the unfortunate child has succumbed to the injuries she received, and her remains will be interred to-morrow.” [33]

William George Brady (1882-1967)

The third child born to John and Mary was William George, on 28 June 1882. He married Hannah Maud Brandis, daughter of Joseph Brandis and Mary Ann (nee Stevens). [34]

William’s descendants (including spouses) currently numbers 247 individuals, with some of the main names including: Mincham, Newman, Skeggs and Taylor, working in fields which include Railway Worker, Computer Technician, Travel Agent, Bank Loans Officer, Secretary, Accountant, Underground Miner, Boilermaker/Welder, Policeman and Postman. [35]

Thomas Edward Brady (1884-1925)

Thomas was the fourth son, born 22 August 1884. He went on to marry Rosetta Isobel Gracia, daughter of Emanuel Judah Garcis and Jessie (nee Klein). [36] Together they had two sons – Thomas and Frederick. Tommie was born with a disability, and despite living to the age of 65, did not have any children of his own.

The descendants from Frederick’s line (including spouses) numbers 39 individuals, working in fields including Farmer, Delivery Driver, Book Binder – Government Printing Office, Retirement Village Manager, Owner Brady Drums and Financial Planner. [37]

Henry “Harry” Brady (1887 – 1972)

The last of John’s children was Henry “Harry” Brady, born 19 January 1887 in Perth, Western Australia. Harry married Elizabeth Annie Baigent, daughter of Samuel Charles Baigent and Annie Eliza (nee Egleton). [38]

Harry’s descendants (including spouses) numbers 215 individuals, with some of the main names being: Miller, Forward, Jackson and Baxter, working in fields including Virgin Australia – AeroCare Flight Support, School Deputy Principal, Sprintcar Driver, Fitness Club Owner, Qualified Cook and Truck Driver. [39]

References & Credits


[1] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: John Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I624

[2] Norman John Miller, stawell-at-iinet.com.au, First Contact January 2001; early research into Frederick Joseph Brady being convict John Brady.

[3] Ireland Births and Baptisms, 1620-1881, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FRWJ-BMR : accessed 25 February 2015), Frederick John Brady, ; citing INISHCARRA,CORK,IRELAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 823,809.

[4] Image credit: 2nd Great Grandson Darryl Brady at Inniscarra Cemetery Feb 2015. Private collection.

[5] Great Famine (Ireland). (2016, May 26). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:31, June 10, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Great_Famine_(Ireland)&oldid=722134736

[6] POLICE INTELLIGENCE, Liverpool Mercury (Liverpool, England), Tuesday, February 14, 1854; Issue 2560, p.6. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900, Gale Document Number: BC3203995902, http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark.do?docType=LTO&docLevel=FASCIMILE&prodId=BNWS&tabID=T012&type=multipage&version=1.0&retrieveFormat=MULTIPAGE_DOCUMENT&enlarge=true&userGroupName=utas1&docPage=page&docId=BC3203995902&contentSet=LTO&source=gale

[7] Assizes Intelligence, Manchester Times (Manchester, England), Wednesday, March 22, 1854; Issue 562, p.7. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900, Gale Document Number: BC3206389399, http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark.do?docType=LTO&docLevel=FASCIMILE&prodId=BNWS&tabID=T012&type=multipage&version=1.0&retrieveFormat=MULTIPAGE_DOCUMENT&enlarge=true&userGroupName=utas1&docPage=article&docId=BC3206389399&contentSet=LTO&source=gale

[8] GENERAL INTELLIGENE, The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, March 24, 1854; Issue 3612, p.3. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900, Gale Document Number: BB3205946169, http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark.do?docType=LTO&docLevel=FASCIMILE&prodId=BNWS&tabID=T012&type=multipage&version=1.0&retrieveFormat=MULTIPAGE_DOCUMENT&userGroupName=utas1&docPage=page&docId=BB3205946169&contentSet=LTO&source=gale

[9] South Lancashire Assizes, Manchester Times (Manchester, England), Saturday, March 25, 1854; Issue 563, p.10. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900, Gale Document Number: BC3206389435, http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark.do?docType=LTO&docLevel=FASCIMILE&prodId=BNWS&tabID=T012&type=multipage&version=1.0&retrieveFormat=MULTIPAGE_DOCUMENT&userGroupName=utas1&docPage=page&docId=BC3206389435&contentSet=LTO&source=gale

[10] Multiple News Items, Nottinghamshire Guardian (London, England), Tuesday, March 30, 1854; Issue 419, p.3. British Library Newspapers, Part II: 1800-1900, Gale Document Number: R3213299683, http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark.do?docType=LTO&docLevel=FASCIMILE&prodId=BNWS&tabID=T012&type=multipage&version=1.0&retrieveFormat=MULTIPAGE_DOCUMENT&userGroupName=utas1&docPage=page&docId=R3213299683&contentSet=LTO&source=gale

[11] Image credit: Class: HO 27; Piece: 108; Page: 28, Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892, Trial: Liverpool Assizes,1854, Lancashire, England, Sentence: Transportation.

[12] Wikipedia, “List of British prison hulks,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_British_prison_hulks&oldid=717328886 (accessed June 10, 2016).

[13] Image credit: Ancestry.com. Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930, Convict Department, Registers Character Book for Nos 3640 – 4432 (R19), http://interactive.ancestry.com.au/60668/44765_352418-00271 for John Brady

[14] Wikipedia, “William Hammond (ship),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=William_Hammond_(ship)&oldid=703412814 (accessed June 10, 2016).

[15] Trove Digitised Newspapers: CRIMINAL SESSION. (1871, April 14). The Perth Gazette and West Australian Times (WA: 1864 – 1874), p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3748664

[16] Image credit: Ancestry.com. Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930, Convict Department, Registers ACC 1156/R16, http://interactive.ancestry.com.au/60668/44765_352421-00536/184519 for John Brady

[17] Image credit: Signature of John Brady as recorded on 1875 ticket of leave clothing form.

[18] Ancestry.com. Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930, Casual Sick Registers, 1850 – 1857 and Changes to Regimen, 1858 – 1877 (CS1 – CS3), http://interactive.ancestry.com.au/60668/44765_352507-00207/400077 for John Brady

[19] Ancestry.com. Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930, Casual Sick Registers, 1850 – 1857 and Changes to Regimen, 1858 – 1877 (CS1 – CS3), http://interactive.ancestry.com.au/60668/44765_352507-00169/399438 for John Brady

[20] Homei A, Worboys M., Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000: Mycoses and Modernity, Palgrave Macmillan; 2013, Chapter 1, Ringworm, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK169210/

[21] Ancestry.com. Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930, Medical Registers by Patient, 1857 – 1872 (M4 – M6), http://interactive.ancestry.com.au/60668/44765_352532-00096/112054 for John Brady

[22] Wikipedia contributors, “Ophthalmia,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ophthalmia&oldid=711441054 (accessed June 10, 2016).

[23] Ancestry.com, Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 – http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1780 . Dongara 1876/4153 Frederick Brady and Frances Mary Dee.

[24] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: John Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I624

[25] Rica Erickson and Gillian O’Mara, Convicts in Western Australia 1850 – 1887, ISBN 1-875560-44-0, Brady, Frederick Joseph (see Brady, James 3944), pp. 51-52

[26] Cemetery – East Perth, Frederick Joseph Brady http://www.eastperthcemeteries.com.au/search-genealogical-results/7308-brady.html

Mary Frances Dee

[27] Ancestry.com, Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 – http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1780 . Dongara 1888/129 Mary Brady and William Cardwell.

[28] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: Mary Frances Dee – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I625

Frederick Francis Brady

[29] Ancestry.com, Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 – http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1780 . Dongara 1901/863 Frederick Francis Brady and Harriett Cousins.

[30] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: Frederick Francis Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I627

Elizabeth May Brady

[31] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: Elizabeth May Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I626

[32] Trove Digitised Newspapers: NEWS OF THE DAY. (2 June 1887). The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article76068357

[33] Trove Digitised Newspapers: NEWS OF THE DAY. (29 July 1887). The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 25, 2012, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article76069562

William George Brady

[34] Ancestry.com, Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 – http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1780 . Dongara 1913/3 William George Brady and Hannah Maud Brandis.

[35] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: William George Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I371

Thomas Edward Brady

[36] Ancestry.com, Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 – http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1780 . Perth 1921/752 Thomas Edward Brady and Rosetta Isobel Garcia.

[37] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: Thomas Edward Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I628

Henry Brady

[38] Ancestry.com, England & Wales, Marriage Index, 1916-2005 – http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8753 Guildford 1919/2a273 Harry Brady and Annie E Baigent.
[39] Web Site, Brady Family Tree in Western Australia: Harry Brady – http://www.bradyfamilytree.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I1606

Darryl Brady
Student ID: 425182
University of Tasmania, Australia
HAA007 Convict Ancestors
Assessment Task 3: Convict Case Study

Original Work – Our Family Past
http://www.ourfamilypast.com/article/home/2141/haa007-intro-who-was-frederick-brady

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